Want to try this simple and delicious mashed ripe plantain recipe at home? Here, you will know all the tips and procedures to make it. Plantains are my favorite ingredients for many years as it is simple, versatile and you can make bulk meals all over the week.

It is gluten-free, whole 30, paleo, with vegetarian and vegan options. Plantains are delicious and nutritious that will be loved by almost everyone at your home. It is a very good choice for breakfast, lunch, or snacks as a side dish. 

These mashed plantains are delightful, savory, juicy that will melt in your mouth quickly, and it’s healthy. Learn how you can easily make mashed plantain with some simple steps. 

Do you love ripe plantains? Then you will also love our Baked Plantains And Vegan Plantain Bread.

whole ripe plantains on cutting boad

 

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Plantains Health Benefits

 

Plantains are a very nutritious food item that has many nutrients such as fiber, vitamins, potassium, and antioxidants. They are a part of the banana family, but they are eaten mostly after cooking. People bake, fry, boil, or make flour to consume plantains. Read Plantain Banana Nutrition.

Here are some of the health benefits of plantains that you have to know,

  • The resistant starch of plantain works as a prebiotic to promote the growth of healthy bacteria in our stomach.
  • The fiber of plantains can improve our bowel functionalities. 
  • Plantains have a GI or glycemic index that ranges from 40, making them a great choice for people who have diabetes. 
  • The presence of potassium in plantains can manage high pressure.
  • Vitamin C, vitamin B6, and magnesium from plantains can help us maintain a healthy immune system.

 

Difference Between Plantain and Banana

 

Plantains and bananas are closely related as they are all members of the banana family. You can easily get confused with plantain and banana as they look similar. Also, they have similar nutritional elements and health benefits. Other than similarities, there are some differences between them. 

    

  • Plantains have much thicker and tougher outer skin than bananas.
  • They are larger and more firm than bananas. 
  • Plantains take a longer time to go from green to yellow than bananas. 
  • When mature bananas look 6 inches long, whereas when plantains are green or yellow, they look at least 12 inches long. 
  • Plantains are usually used for cooking rather than eating raw like bananas. 
  • Bananas taste sweet and soft when they are ripe, but plantains are starchy and lower in sugar.  

Types of Plantain

Plantain is one of the most versatile fruits that you can make sweet and savory versions of. In fact, there are two versions of plantain that can be found yellow and green. When you are going to cook plantains, it is essential to determine whether it is ripe or unripe.

  • Green plantain (unripe): Unripe plantains are not sweet at all, more firm, and difficult to peel. They are savory and more starch enriched. Unripe plantains are usually used as a meat alternative in West African Cuisine. It is best for making Plantain Chips and patties (mashed and then fried), Mangu, etc., dishes.  
  • Yellow plantain (ripe): Ripe plantains are mostly yellow or yellow-brown in color. They are very sweet, easy to peel, not firm, and easy to slice. You can make mashed plantain, use it to make a sweet custard, baking cake, bread, and many more.     
boiled plantains in a white bowl on a beige background

Ways to Cook Plantain

However, you can cook both plantains in several ways such as, 

  • Fried
  • Boiled
  • Roasted
  • Mashed
  • Oven-Baked
  • Grilled 

Out of all these cooking ways. Mashed, grill, baking, and roasting are the healthiest cooking processes. I usually prefer boiling and mashing plantain because I don’t have to deal with smoke from roasting, grilling, and frying smokes. Cooked plantain can be eaten as a snack or side dish with other main courses.   

Where Can I Buy and Store Plantains? 

 

You can find plantains in most supermarkets and grocery stores. You can also get farmer’s markets that cater plantains to some Chinese markets and Eastern Mediterranean cuisines. Also, you will definitely get them from any African store or market. 

You can always use online shopping options if you can not find plantains in markets. When you are buying plantains, make sure to avoid those that are overly ripe and mushy. Go for the green or yellow but firm ones as they are great for mashing.  

close up mashed ripe plantain on a white plate on a beige background

Mashed Ripe Plantain Ingredients

 

  • Plantains – ripe plantains with yellow skin are best.
  • Coconut milk – adds a creamy, fluffy texture to your mashed plantain and a great flavor.
  • Agave – just enough sweetener to make the natural flavors of the plantain pop. (optional)
  • Cinnamon – perfect flavor that goes with the coconut. A little goes a long way.
  • Salt – use Himalayan salt, Kosher, or sea salt.
  • Cayenne pepper – this is optional.

How To Make Mashed Ripe Plantains

 

  • Fill a large saucepan or pot ¾ with water to a boil. 
  • With a knife, cut the ends of the plantains and slice plantain in half. Now slice lengthwise across the peel where the knife meets the flesh. Remove the peel from plantains and repeat this process with the rest of them. 
  • In the saucepan or pot, carefully add the peeled plantain pieces in hot water. Set the heat to low or medium temperature and leave to simmer until you get the tender plantain. 
  • To find out if the plantains are well-cooked, use a fork to prick the plantain. It should determine if the plantains are soft to touch with a bright yellow texture. 
  • Drain the excess water from the pot and put the plantains in a medium-size bowl, and allow them to cool down before you start to mash them. 
  • Use a potato masher or a fork to mash the plantains. If the plantains are firm, you may need to add some coconut milk to assist you with mashing. 
  • Once they are mashed, add additional ingredients and spices according to your taste. I have added some agave, cayenne pepper, ground cinnamon, and salt.

Notes and Tips

 

  • You can leave the skins on if you want, and after boiling, you can easily peel them off with your hands.
  • You can keep the plantain in the freezer once you have mashed it. Be sure to thaw out and warm them in the oven before using them. 
  • The cooking time may differ depending on the ripeness of the plantain. Mostly, plantains need 7 to 10 minutes to boil perfectly.   
  • Always use a fork to check the plantains if they are perfectly cooked or not. If the fork goes through the flesh easily, then it means that the plantains are ready to mash. 
  • Be sure to cut the plantains into pieces before boiling, as they will cook quickly if they are chopped into pieces. 

Other Delicious Vegan Plantain Recipes

  1. Plantain Porridge
  2. Stewed Plantain Dumplings
  3. Plantain Fritters
  4. Air Fryer Plantains
  5. Vegan Pastelon
  6. Vegan Plantain Bread
  7. Pineapple Guacamole Baked Plantain

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Categories

Nutrition

(Per serving)
  • Energy: 142 kcal / 594 kJ
  • Fat: 2.7 g
  • Protein: 1.4 g
  • Carbs: 31.8 g

Cook Time

  • Preparation: 10 min
  • Cooking: 15 min
  • Ready in: 25 min
  • For: 6 Servings

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Fill a large saucepan or pot ¾ with water to a boil. 
  2. With a knife, cut the ends of the plantains and slice plantain in half. Now slice lengthwise across the peel where the knife meets the flesh. Remove the peel from plantains and repeat this process with the rest of them. 
  3. In the saucepan or pot, carefully add the peeled plantain pieces in hot water. Set the heat to low or medium temperature and leave to simmer until you get the tender plantain. 
  4. To find out if the plantains are well-cooked, use a fork to prick the plantain. It should determine if the plantains are soft to touch with a bright yellow texture. 
  5. Drain the excess water from the pot and put the plantains in a medium-size bowl, and allow them to cool down before you start to mash them. 
  6. Use a potato masher or a fork to mash the plantains. If the plantains are firm, you may need to add some coconut milk to assist you with mashing. 
  7. Once they are mashed, add additional ingredients and spices according to your taste. I have added some agave, cayenne pepper, ground cinnamon, and salt.
Recipe author's Gravatar image

Michelle Blackwood, RN

Hi, I’m Michelle, I’m the voice, content creator and photographer behind Healthier Steps. I share vegan and gluten-free recipes because of past health issues. My goal is to help you make healthier choices and show you how healthy eating is easy and delicious.