So it is spring here in Florida and I have been gifted by my friends with loquat fruit, leaves, and even a plant. Read more about Loquat here.
I have been coming up with ways of enjoying this seasonal fruit, for example, check out my Vegan Loquat Cheesecake recipe. Loquat leaves, when boiled, makes a wonderful tea, so I decided to try that as well.

loquat fruit and loquat leaf for making loquat tea on a brown burlap napkin on a wooden background

Loquat Tea

I have been making herbal teas all my life. It was part of our culture growing up in Jamaica to have a hot beverage for breakfast. It could either be mint tea, other herbs, or a hot chocolate beverage (Milo).

Later on, when I moved to England, tea drinking was even more popular. It appeared as if my friend’s kettles were permanently boiling water on their stoves.

Every time I would visit, the first thing they asked me is, ‘would you like a cup of tea mate?’

When I moved to the USA, it definitely wasn’t as popular to drink tea throughout the day, not unless you were a shift worker. 

As my love from herbal teas grew, I developed a passion for exploring all kinds of herbs and their benefits and as we moved throughout the East Coast.

In the little time we spent in Ohio, I had to learn to depend more upon the herbs that were close to my immediate surroundings.

fresh loquat leaf for making loquat leaf tea

To learn more, I visited farmers’ markets, attend foraging classes and tours, and joined many groups on social media about native plants. 

In New Jersey, we enjoyed red clover, mullein, and plantain. When we moved to Virginia, we enjoyed wild lettuce, dandelion, red clover, milk thistle, burdock, echinacea, and goldenseal.

In Ohio, we had lots of nettles, St. John’s Wort, passionflower, and chicory. 

Now in Florida, there are many of my favorite herbs that don’t grow well where I live because the soil is so sandy. I have been learning to adjust and utilize the herbs in my region. 

What Is Herbal Infusion?

The herbal infusion method is the best way of capturing the flavors and oils of the plant. The leaves, flowers, root, and bark of the plant are steeped in boiling water to create a beverage. 

Loquat Leaf Tea Health Benefits

Most people who enjoy eating loquat fruit aren’t familiar with the health benefits of the loquat leaves.

In Japan, the loquat leaves (Eriobotrya japonica) are used to make a delicious tea.

Fortunately, loquat leaves have been studied and now there are scientific validations on the many health benefits of loquat leaves

Research shows that loquat leaves contain a compound called Triterpenoids, known for their anti-allergenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-aging properties. Learn more here.

You can apply loquat leaves topically as creams to combat acne and other skin conditions, thanks to their anti-inflammatory properties.

The anti-inflammatory benefits extend to the lungs, possibly soothing coughs, asthmatic conditions and relieving pain, read more here.

Loquat leaves are high in antioxidants, which fight against free radical damage,

Research has shown that consuming the leaves is beneficial to combat diabetes, liver disease, and cancer, read more here.

Where Can I Buy Loquat Leaves Tea?

Loquat plants can be purchased at nurseries, farmers market, the dried loose leaves are sold online or as teabags.

How To Make Loquat Leaf Tea?

Things You’ll Need

  1. Water – Fresh cold filtered spring water of the highest quality is best for brewing the best tea.
  2. You need to boil water to infuse the loquat leaves and extract the flavors.
  3. Stainless steel pot, kettle – Using stainless steel doesn’t affect the final taste of tea. Do not use aluminum pots or kettle. 
  4. Knife – scrape and cut the leaves into strips
  5. Cup 

Loquat leaf being scraped with a knife on a marbled background

Pick about 2 tender leaves. The top should be glossy and the bottom furry.

The fur underside of the leaves needs to be removed. Take a knife or a new dish scrubbing pad and scrape off the fur off the leaves.

Many believe that the furry coating on the underside can potentially cause throat irritation.

Rinse the leaves under cold running water, dry the leaves with a paper towel or clean dishcloth. 

Remove the veins of the loquat leaf with a knife

Remove the veins and chop the leaves into pieces. Heat cold water in a pot or kettle on medium-high heat and bring to a boil.

Chopped loquat leaves being prepared for making loquat tea on a white marbled background

Add chopped loquat leaves to the pot or kettle of boiling water, cover pot reduce heat to simmer leaves for 5 minutes, turn of heat allow the tea to steep for 10-20 minutes

 Strain the tea from the pot. Tea is ready to drink. You can sweeten it with your favorite sweetener; I enjoyed mine with stevia.

chopped loquat leaves being steeped in boiling water, water is red

Side Effects Of Loquat Leaves

Asian countries have consumed loquat tea daily for thousands of years. There is only one reported case of a 39-year male developing toxic myopathy after drinking 2 liters of loquat leaf tea daily for 2 weeks.

He drank the loquat leaf tea to reduce his triglyceride levels.

Although his levels significantly reduced, he developed muscle weakness and pain, particularly in his arms. He received intravenous fluids upon his admission to the hospital. Three days later, they discharged him, and he continued drinking loquat leaf tea at a lower dose.

Other Amazing Great Posts

overhead view oquat tea from fresh loquat leaves in a white cup , the tea looks red, on a burlap napkin on a wooden background with loquat fruit and leaves to the side

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loquat tea from fresh loquat leaves in a white cup , the tea looks red, on a burlap napkin on a wooden background with loquat fruit and leaves to the side

Loquat Tea

Learn how to make flavorful loquat tea (Biwa Cha) using loose leaves prepared by herbal infusion. Enjoy the fresh, flavorful and beneficial taste of loquat leaves at home with my easy step-by-step method. 
4.95 from 20 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: American
Keyword: loquat tea
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 1 serving
Calories: 1kcal

Equipment

  • 1 small pot

Ingredients

  • 2 young loquat leaves
  • 2 cups filtered water
  • sweetener to taste

Instructions

  • Pick about 2 tender leaves. The top should be glossy and the bottom furry. The fur underside of the leaves needs to be removed. Take a knife or a new dish scrubbing pad and scrape off the fur off the leaves.
  • It is believed that the furry coating on the underside has the potential to cause throat irritation. Rinse the leaves under cold running water, dry the leaves with a paper towel or clean dishcloth.
  • Remove the veins and chop the leaves into pieces. Heat cold water in a pot or kettle on medium-high heat and bring to a boil.
  • Add chopped loquat leaves to the pot or kettle of boiling water, cover pot reduce heat to simmer leaves for 5 minutes, turn of heat allow the tea to steep for 10-20 minutes
  • Strain the tea from the pot. Tea is ready to drink. You can sweeten it with your favorite sweetener; I enjoyed mine with stevia.

Nutrition

Calories: 1kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.3g | Protein: 0.1g | Fat: 0.02g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.01g | Sodium: 24mg | Potassium: 11mg | Fiber: 0.2g | Vitamin A: 85IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 0.1mg