These taro fries are a tasty side dish for any meal. In comparison to the famous potato fries, this is something different! These taro fries are taste just as good as simple to prepare!

Let’s admit it; fries go well with everything. The outside is salty, while the inside is fluffy and hot. They are incredibly gratifying, and both large and tiny hands crave more.

It’s no surprise that they’re a favorite side dish in America, paired with anything from burgers to pizza.

Although I love regular potato fries, these taro root fries are a more nutritious, delightful, and filling side dish.

I always love enjoying taro, which we also call Cocoyam. We normally season them with salt and fry them until they are crispy. Fries can be spiced up and adapted to fit every meal, one of their numerous plusses. And if you’re aware of my recipes, you’ll know how much I enjoy adding spices and flavors from my Ancient ancestors into my cuisine as frequently as possible, and these delectable taro root fries do just that.

You will also love, Mashed Taro and Taro Chips

What Is Taro Root?

Many people I know are unfamiliar with this vegetable. Before starting the recipe, I would like to explain it to them.

Taro root, commonly known as Cocoyam, dasheen, malanga, or Malanga coco is an ancient Southeast Asian root vegetable. Although it is now native to a few tropical and subtropical regions, it is widely available worldwide. It looks like a potato with its dark exterior and creamy interior, but it’s more starchy and sweeter. Read More About Malanga Coco.

peeling taro

Why Is Taro Root Preferred Over Potatoes?

Taro root has a solid texture, making it ideal for cooking over high heat, such as frying. It absorbs flavors like a sponge and is hence excellent for mashing. The sweetness it imparts on the taste is more enticing, especially when combined with salty and spicy flavors. Additionally, it contains substantially more fiber and minerals than potatoes.

Of course, regular potato fry has a special place in our hearts.  But the taro root fries are a more nutritious, lively, and refined side dish.

Nutritional Value and Health Benefits

A starchy vegetable, taro root provides two important carbohydrates: fiber and resistant starch. Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that humans are unable to digest. It does not affect blood glucose levels because it isn’t absorbed. It also aids in the absorption of other carbohydrates, reducing blood sugar increases after meals.

According to one study, every additional 10 grams of fiber ingested each day reduced the risk of death from heart disease by 17%. This is thought to be linked to fiber’s cholesterol-lowering properties, but more research is needed.

Taro root has more than 6 grams of fiber per cup (132 grams), more than twice as much as a comparable 138-gram portion of potatoes, making it a high-fiber food.

Taro root includes polyphenols, which are plant-based substances with various health advantages, including the ability to lower cancer risk. Taro root’s primary polyphenol is quercetin, which is also found in significant levels in onions, apples, and tea. Quercetin has been shown to kill cancer cells and decrease the growth of cancer cells in test tubes and animals.

According to studies, persons who consume more fiber have less body fat and lower body weight. This could be because fiber delays stomach emptying, keeping you fuller for longer and lowering your daily calorie intake. This may result in weight loss over time. Taro root’s resistant starch could have similar effects.

cutting taro fries

How To Make Taro Fries?

Taro root fries are a crispy, healthy, and tempting addition to any dinner. Additionally, they’re also quite simple to prepare. You’ll require the following simple pantry ingredients:

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds taro
  • 1 tablespoon avocado oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper and spray or brush with oil.
  2. Peel taro, wash and cut into 1/2 inch strips.
  3. Bring water to a boil in a large pot.
  4. Add taro and cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat and drain water using a colander. Pat dry being gentle.
  5. Place taro in a large bowl and toss with avocado oil, garlic, smoked paprika, pepper, and salt.
  6. Place in a single layer on the baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes.
  7. Flip fries and bake for another 10-15 minutes or until fries are crispy on the edges

Leftover Storage Tips

The easiest way to enjoy this recipe is to eat it right away. If you have any leftover fries, they can be kept in the fridge for up to three days. Reheat for 5-7 minutes in the oven, and they’re ready to eat.

These can also be frozen. Allow cooling before storing in a zip bag in a freezer-safe container after cooking. These should not be thawed. Simply remove from the freezer or reheat at 180 degrees for a few minutes.

Recipe Notes

  • Using a vegetable peeler to peel taro is easier. After peeling, do not wash the taro because it will become slimy and difficult to handle or chop.
  • When peeling and cutting taro for the first time, it is best to wear gloves.
  • To avoid itchiness, soak your hands in vinegar before peeling.
  • When handling raw taro, avoid touching your eyes.
  • Depending on your preferences, you can use and leave out the spices. Taro fries can also be simply seasoned with salt and pepper. If you want, you can also add your favorite ingredients.

Other Fries To Prepare

  1. Parsnip Fries
  2. Cajun Plantain Fries
  3. Baked Yuca Fries
  4. Beet Fries With Chipotle Aioli
  5. Air Fryer Carrot Fries
  6. Air Fryer Zucchini Fries
  7. Jicama Fries In The Air Fryer

close up taro fries in a black bowl on a grey background 

Please give this recipe a try and leave a comment to let me know about your feedback!

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Categories

Nutrition

(Per serving)
  • Energy: 163 kcal / 681 kJ
  • Fat: 0.9 g
  • Protein: 2.2 g
  • Carbs: 37.9 g

Cook Time

  • Preparation: 10 min
  • Cooking: 25 min
  • Ready in: 35 min
  • For: 3 Servings

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper and spray or brush with oil.
  2. Peel taro, wash and cut into 1/2 inch strips.
  3. Bring water to a boil in a large pot.
  4. Add taro and cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat and drain water using a colander. Pat dry being gentle.
  5. Place taro in a large bowl and toss with avocado oil, garlic, smoked paprika, pepper, and salt.
  6. Place in a single layer on the baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes.
  7. Flip fries and bake for another 10-15 minutes or until fries are crispy on the edges
Recipe author's Gravatar image

Michelle Blackwood, RN

Hi, I’m Michelle, I’m the voice, content creator and photographer behind Healthier Steps. I share vegan and gluten-free recipes because of past health issues. My goal is to help you make healthier choices and show you how healthy eating is easy and delicious.