This vegan feijoada (stew of black beans from Brazil) is a plant-based adaptation of a classic Brazilian dish. The ultimate comfort dish, veggie feijoada is delicious, incredibly healthy, and comforting.

 

Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew is my version of this traditional dish that is served throughout Brazil. It has now become a family favorite that is so quick and easy to prepare!

I always prepared my beans with a Caribbean twist by adding coconut milk, spring onions, thyme, and allspice to it until a Brazilian friend came to my home for a visit about 14 years ago and prepared her version and I was sold.

She added an entire bulb of garlic, bell pepper, and onion to the beans and cooked them until they were tender. She then seasoned the beans with aromatic cumin and oregano.

My friend didn’t measure her ingredients while we talked and enjoyed each other’s company.  I was so curious to see how the beans would turn out. I was so impressed with the results, that I have been making variations of it since then. The beans were so creamy and delicious ♥

The traditional Brazilian black bean stew (Feijoada), is usually made with black beans and various salted pork and beef products. It is traditionally served with farofa, which is a toasted yucca meal.

This stew traditionally takes anywhere from 2-3 hours to cook, but the vegan version takes less than half the time. So if you want to save time and still get the benefits of a rich protein dish, then my Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew is your answer.

Black beans are a great source of protein, calcium, folate, and fiber.  We are always concerned as vegans if we are eating enough protein. Yet, I have never met anyone here in the USA who is protein deficient, have you?

Here is a list of some of the other benefits:

  • The calcium in black beans is beneficial in building and strengthening our bones.
  • Folate is beneficial for cell growth and tissue growth.
  • Fiber, as we know is beneficial for a healthy digestive system, controlling blood sugar, and improving heart health.

As always, I suggest you read the complete article for useful information. However, you can find the detailed recipe with exact ingredients and step-by-step instructions below.

Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew

What Is Feijoada?

Brazil’s national food is feijoada, which is pronounced fay-jwah-dah.

The name is derived from the word feijo, which means bean, a key element in the dish. Traditionally eaten with rice, collard greens, and farofa, this hearty slow-cooked stew features black beans, salted beef, and pig (toasted manioc flour).

When it comes to the dish’s origins, the most widely accepted theory holds that it was developed by slaves in Brazil using leftovers from their masters, including pig’s feet, tail, and ears.

Well, there are some flaws with that theory. First, back then, the head, tail, and paws of a pig were considered delicious and wouldn’t have been thrown away so easily.

In actuality, stews were widely consumed throughout Europe. Food scarcity was prevalent from the 16th through the 18th centuries. There could be no waste, because Cassoulet, Cocido Madrileo, and Fagiolata were frequent dishes produced by combining a variety of inexpensive ingredients.

Why You’ll Love This Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew?

  • It can be made in a slow cooker, an oven, or on the stove.
  • It’s all done in one pot.
  • Easy to customize.
  • This Stew is a perfect dish for your next potluck party or weekend dinner.
  • With canned beans, it’s quite simple to make. You can use canned black beans or dry beans that you boil yourself to make Brazilian stew. In order to drastically reduce the cooking time, you can choose the canned option.
  • It has a great flavor. Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew offers a symphony of flavors despite only requiring a small number of ingredients.
  • Leftover food is wonderful. Making this ahead of time allows you to enjoy it, even more, the next day.
  • Black beans are healthy since they are a source of fiber and plant-based protein. They also contain magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, folate, and thiamin (vitamin B1). If you’ve ever heard that beans are “unhealthy,” it may be because beans, until properly cooked, still contain lectins, an anti-nutrient. Many plant-based meals include lectins, but if you eat completely cooked black beans, you won’t need to be concerned.
  • Black beans are cheap; a 15-oz can costs about $0.70 and a 16-oz box of dry black beans costs approximately $.99. The first one makes about 2 cups and can feed two people, while the second one makes 5 cups and can feed at least five people. Of course, costs can differ based on where you live and where you purchase them.
  • Also, organic black beans are more expensive and available everywhere. However, they are mostly used in the Caribbean and cuisines from Central and South America. Brazil (feijó preto), Venezuela (caraotas negras), Guatemala, Cuba (frijoles negros) Puerto Rico, and Mexico are just a few examples.
  • Black beans are an extremely versatile ingredient. Many simple dishes, such as burritos and taco salad, can be made with these Mexican black beans.

Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew

Ingredients Description

  • Dried black beans: Brazilian stew is often made using black beans, however other varieties of beans can be used if desired. If possible, avoid using those stale beans that have been sitting in your cabinet for the past 1 year. They cook less evenly as they get older.
  • 6 cups water
  • Coconut oil: Just a little coconut oil for sautéing the aromatics.
  • Onion: The onion provides a base for the dish. The flavor of onion is slightly sweet but savory
  • Garlic: It is better to use fresh garlic for a strong flavor. However, you can use frozen, or even garlic powder to flavor your stew.
  • Bell pepper: Red bell pepper offers a citrusy and sweet flavor. They add beautiful colors. If you want your dish to be visually more appealing, you can use red, yellow, and green peppers.
  • Cumin gives black beans a warm, earthy, and delicately smokey flavor.
  • Dried oregano: The lovely green herb imparts a pleasant, somewhat unexpectedly earthy flavor to a variety of dishes. Oregano has a strong, earthy flavor with a faint bitterness typical of the aromatic organic component camphor.
  • Bay leaves: My bean dishes always include bay leaves. They give the hearty beans a delicate, almost herbal scent that gives them some freshness.
  • Vegetable broth, or water (optional): You can use any broth you have on hand and even make your own with vegetable peelings. If you are not vegan you can use beef or chicken broth for a more rich and deep flavor. You can use water if you don’t have any broth on hand.
  • Cilantro: In Latin America, this is a typical herb for seasoning beans before serving. You can use parsley in its stead.
  • Cayenne pepper: Cayenne pepper adds a kick to the stew that you’ll like. If you don’t have cayenne pepper, paprika will suffice. Additionally, if you enjoy spice and heat, throw a scotch bonnet.
  • Salt to taste: Adding salt to the stew helps to bring the flavors together and make the dish complete.

How To Make Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew?

  • If you are using dried beans, sort beans to remove debris. Rinse beans and soak overnight in cold water at least 3 inches above. If using canned beans go to number 4 of the recipe instructions.
  • The following day, drain and rinse beans. Place beans in a large pot with cold water.
  • Bring to boil on medium-high, cover, and reduce heat to simmer until beans are tender about one hour. Set aside.
  • Heat oil in a large pot on medium heat, add onion, and saute until soft, about 3 minutes.
  • Stir in garlic, bell pepper, cumin, oregano, and bay leaves. And cook for another minute.
  • Stir in beans (along with remaining liquid if using cooked beans). If using canned beans add water or vegetable broth
  • Bring to boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally for flavors to blend. Using the back of a ladle mash some of the beans to help to make a creamy thick sauce. Add extra liquid if needed.
  • Stir in cilantro, cayenne pepper, and salt to season.

Leftovers And Storage

In an airtight container, leftovers can be stored for up to three days in the refrigerator.

Take it out of the fridge and reheat it on the stove or in the microwave. You might need to add some water.

This vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew can be stored in Ziploc bags or freezer-safe containers for up to three months.

Recipe Notes And Tips

  • Orange slices are traditionally offered with feijoada because, according to popular belief, they aid the digestion of the black beans.
  • To thicken your feijoada, mash part of the beans using a potato masher or a stick blender.
  • Make sure the dried beans you choose to use aren’t too old you do. Your pantry’s black beans may cook unevenly if they have been there for over a year.
  • Other grains like quinoa, buckwheat, brown rice, or pearl barley can be served.
  • This black bean stew can be refrigerated for three to four days or frozen for one month in an airtight container.

Need Some More Holiday Season Inspiration?

Check out these additional warm and comforting stews: ‘

White Acre Pea Stew

Jamaican Yellow Yam Stew

Jamaican Pigeon Peas Stew

Potato Zucchini Soup

Black Chickpeas Stew

Jamaican Sweet Potato Stew

Vegan Lentil Stew

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I Make Feijoada With Canned Beans?

The essential component of the traditional Brazilian feijoada is black beans, and the recipe frequently includes raw dried beans. That’s because they must simmer gently until a thick stew is formed and the liquid has decreased.

Although this method produces a thicker soup, it may be fairly time-consuming because the beans must be soaked overnight and then simmered for at least forty minutes.

You can use canned black beans in this recipe instead of the traditional feijoada for a speedier alternative.

If you’re using canned beans, don’t toss out the brine liquid; instead, add it to the soup. Due to the high starch content, it will aid in soup thickening and also offer more flavor.

If you want to use dried black beans, soak them in a bowl of water at room temperature for at least four hours.

Which Vegetables Can I Use In This Stew?

Greens and veggies are frequently offered as a side dish rather than being cooked with it.

The soup was made with delicious veggies, such as bell pepper, cilantro, and bay leaf in this vegan-friendly variation.

Other delectable vegetable options for your Brazilian feijoada are:

  • Pumpkin
  • Cabbage
  • Spinach
  • Chayote
  • Bananas
  • Potatoes and sweet potatoes

When Is A Good Time To Serve Stew?

Traditional Brazilian stew can be served at any time of day or night, in my opinion. However, I believe that when prepared at family gatherings in the fall and winter, it tastes the best.

What To Serve With This Stew?

Serve rice and orange slices alongside these Brazilian black beans. Kale is frequently offered with this dinner, either steamed or stir-fried.

Slices of orange are said to help with digestion. The hearty stew is well refreshed by the sweet and juicy oranges. Therefore, when preparing this dish, be careful to test the entire combination of rice, stew, greens, and orange. You’ll adore it, I’m certain.

Are Black Beans Keto Friendly?

Owing to its high carbohydrate content, black beans should be avoided on a typical ketogenic diet. Low-carb bean substitutes like green beans, on the other hand, can be consumed in moderation.

 

That’s all there is to it!

Give this recipe a try. It’s incredibly delicious and super easy. I hope you like it. As always, I would love to hear from you. So if you tried this recipe or any other from my website, please let me know how it turned out in the comments below!

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Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew (Feijoada) in white plate

Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew (Feijoada)

This vegan feijoada (stew of black beans from Brazil) is a plant-based adaptation of a classic Brazilian dish. The ultimate comfort dish, veggie feijoada is delicious, incredibly healthy, and comforting.
5 from 2 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Entrée, Lunch, Main Course
Cuisine: Brazil
Keyword: Vegan Brazilian Black Bean Stew (Feijoada)
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Servings: 8 servings
Calories: 229kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 pound dried black beans or 4-14 ounce cans, drained
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 10 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 cup bell pepper (red or green, I used red)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 cups vegetable broth or water (optional)
  • 1/4 cup cilantro chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cayenne pepper
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

  • If you are using dried beans, sort beans to remove debris. Rinse beans and soak overnight in cold water at least 3 inches above. If using canned beans go to number 4 of recipe instructions.
  • The following day, drain and rinse beans. Place beans in a large pot with cold water.
  • Bring to boil on medium-high, cover and reduce heat to simmer until beans are tender, about one hour. Set aside.
  • Heat oil in a large pot on medium heat, add onion and saute until soft, about 3 minutes.
  • Stir in garlic, bell pepper, cumin, oregano, and bay leaves. and cook for another minute.
  • Stir in beans (along with remaining liquid if using cooked beans). If using canned beans add water or vegetable broth
  • Bring to boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally for flavors to blend. Using the back of a ladle mash some of the beans to help to make a creamy thick sauce. Add extra liquid if needed.
  • Stir in cilantro, cayenne pepper and salt to season.

Nutrition

Calories: 229kcal | Carbohydrates: 40g | Protein: 13g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.4g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.2g | Sodium: 367mg | Potassium: 923mg | Fiber: 10g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 846IU | Vitamin C: 26mg | Calcium: 90mg | Iron: 3mg