5.03

Sorrel Drink

Sorrel Drink

Sorrel Drink is a popular drink that used to be served mostly during Christmas time in Jamaica, but now its served all year round. It has great health benefits too!

 Sorrel Drink

What is Sorrel

Sorrel not to be confused with sorrel the herb, is a cousin of the hibiscus flower. The calyces of the flower are dried and made into a popular drink throughout the Caribbean, Latin American (in Mexico it is called 'Flor de Jamaica',  Australia it is Rosella. Middle Eastern, and Africa countries in Nigeria it is called Zobo drink. It has a tart cranberry flavor.

Sorrel Drink Health Benefits

The calyces of the sorrel are high in Vitamin C and flavonoids. Studies have shown that these properties have great health benefits. They are anti-inflammatory, protecting the body from oxidative damages.

Jamaican Sorrel Plant to make sorrel drink

In Jamaica, the calyces of the sorrel are collected, then dried. The dried calyces are then steeped in boiling water along with ginger and other whole spices such as allspice, cinnamon sticks, cloves.

Jamaican sorrel drink is traditionally sweetened with sugar and rum is added. I love to make mine simple, just with the addition of ginger and orange skin without the alcohol. I normally steep mine overnight but it’s not necessary. Check out my favorite holiday season recipes 25 HOLIDAY RECIPES.

Dried sorrel can be found in African, West Indian, and Asian grocers. Other names that it could be called are, ‘Jamaican Flower’, ‘Agua de Flor de Jamaica,’ ‘Jamaican Flower,’ ‘Hibiscus’. You can also purchase it online HERE

Jamaican Sorrel Drink

I was fortunate to get a large bag of freshly picked sorrel from a new friend here in Florida. I will be drying the calyces so they can last me throughout the year until I can grow my own.

I used the dried ones I already had for this recipe since most people will be able to get the dried ones. Above, I share a photo of how the fresh ones look. I’m fortunate to have an orange tree growing here, the tree is loaded with oranges. So I decided to add orange peel to my recipe. In Jamaica sugar is the sweetener of choice, but you can substitute with maple syrup or liquid stevia.

Other Delicious Jamaican Recipes To Try:


Per portion
Energy:
100 kcal / 418 kJ

Ingredients

For: 4 servings
Preparation:
10 min
Cooking:
5 min
Ready in:
15 min

Instructions

  1. Bring water to boil in a large pot. Add sorrel, ginger, orange peel and allspice berries.

  2. Remove from heat and allow to steep for 2 hours or cool and place in the refrigerator overnight

  3. Strain. Sweeten with your favorite sweetener. Refrigerate and enjoy!

Notes

Jamaican Sorrel Drink

Please Leave a Comment and a Rating

Rating

9 Comments
  1. Lisa M Smith
    February 11, 2018

    5.01

    My daughters’ mother-in-law made this one holiday and I loved it, since going vegan I wanted to add it to my special treat list and I found so many different ways to make it and all are lovely. Thank you for sharing your recipe, it is delicious. <3 I may add rum nest time. c;

    • Michelle Blackwood
      February 11, 2018

      Awesome thanks, I hope you enjoy. This Christmas my husband made it for his co=workers and he only used sorrel, ginger, allspice and organic cane sugar and it was very delicious. This drink has many health benefits as well. Enjoy!

  2. Ariana
    January 21, 2018

    5.01

    Amazing drink!This is a childhood favorite of mine.

    • Michelle Blackwood
      January 21, 2018

      Thank you Ariana!

  3. Ashley
    January 21, 2018

    5.01

    One of my favorite drinks!

    • Michelle Blackwood
      January 21, 2018

      Thank you Ashley!

  4. Karyl | Karyl's Kulinary Krusade
    December 18, 2017

    My parents are from Trinidad, and I grew up drinking sorrel! I haven’t had it in ages though…I may need to try to make this myself

    • Michelle Blackwood
      December 18, 2017

      That’s awesome, I love Trinidadian cuisine. I hope you get to make some for Christmas holiday!

  5. Dunori
    December 18, 2017

    Sorrel causes such nice memories… in T&T the flowers come in Red, White, and Black varieties (yes, just like our flag). I put mine in the slow cooker and steep overnight for max extraction (at least that’s the effect I tell myself happens). Trini style is the same except no ginger and cloves instead of allspice.