The soy milk recipe is an excellent substitute for cow’s milk and much healthier for you. It is easy and affordable to make, and tastes delicious!

 

If you are a lactose intolerant person, and you have tried some of the various milk substitutes available for a long time and still haven’t found what works for you, then thanks to the Soy milk recipe, your search ends once and for all.

You’ve probably heard of the benefits of soy milk. The world has a love affair with soy products and they are used in a variety of recipes to help make our lives better. Soy milk is an amazing addition to any meal or snack, providing protein and calcium in every glass.

I LOVE soy milk. I’ll share with you why I love soy milk so much – keep reading if you haven’t already :)

Soy milk recipe in glasses

Why You’ll Like This Recipe?

If you like soy milk, this recipe will be a great addition to your kitchen!

  • It is lactose-free, making it ideal for lactose intolerance sufferers.
  • Soy milk is a great choice for Paleo and Keto diets.
  • It’s super easy and tastes great.
  • It’s an all-natural option, provides calcium and protein, and it’s cholesterol free.
  • By making your own soy milk, you will know exactly what ingredients are being used.
  • You can adjust the flavors of the recipe to please your own tastes.
  • Soy milk can be used in place of cow’s milk and is packed full of antioxidants.
  • It’s made at home affordably.
  • Due to its thicker consistency compared to other plant milk, I adore using it for baking.
  • Plus, the fresh taste of homemade soy milk stands up against commercial brands.

soaked soy beans in water

Ingredients For Soy Milk

  • Dry Soybeans: Yellow soybeans make the best soy milk.
  • Water
  • Salt: I added a pinch of salt, but you can make it salt-free.
  • Vanilla: The addition of vanilla enhances the flavor, but it is optional
  • Sweetener: To taste

rinse soaked soybeans

How To Make Soy Milk Recipe?

  1. Rinse soybeans and discard water.
  2. Add soybeans to a large bowl and cover with water, about 2 inches above the soybeans.
  3. Soak soybeans overnight or for 8 hours.
  4. The following day, remove the soybean skin and rinse the soybeans. Add 1 cup of soaked soybeans along with 3 cups of water to the blender and process until smooth. Repeat until all the beans are processed.

soybean in water in a blender jug

5. Strain soymilk using a nut milk bag or cheesecloth and set the pulp aside to make patties.

Straining soy milk from soybeans

6. Transfer the soymilk to a large pot and bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a wooden spatula.  reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. If a film occurs on the top, remove it and save it, it is tofu skin

Cooking soy milk in pot

7. Allow soymilk to cool, and stir in salt, vanilla, and your favorite sweetener. Keep refrigerated.

Storage Instructions

Refrigerate homemade soy milk for 3-5 days. It has passed its optimum if it starts to taste or smell sour.

For three to six months, soy milk can also be frozen. However, this may have a small impact on the milk’s texture (but the nutrition will be the same).

Variations

I generally keep my recipes for making dairy-free milk to a minimum. However, because plain soy milk has such a strong flavor, not everyone finds it to their taste. Several flavoring choices are available to mitigate this and enhance the flavor of this soy milk recipe.

The first consideration is sweetness. To naturally sweeten your homemade soy milk, I recommend using Medjool dates,  or maple syrup. I prefer to keep these recipes free of refined sugar.

Try to consider adding something more interesting such as cocoa powder or cinnamon.

Recipe Notes

  • Make sure to use a large stockpot to avoid the soymilk from boiling over.
  • During boiling, skim off the foam that begins to float to the top. This foam should be skimmed as much as you can.
  • You can make your milk as thick or as watery as desired by adjusting the amount of water used. However, it typically has a thicker consistency than other milk substitutes.
  • Homemade soy milk tastes grassier than commercial soy milk.
  • The residual fiber is known as okara or u no hara and can be used as a food ingredient, as well as a fertilizer if it is dried or frozen.

What Can Be Made From Soy Milk?

Many different dishes can be prepared with soy milk. Here are a few examples:

Oatmeal: You can prepare oats in a variety of ways. Usually, I cook mine with water, let it cool, then add more liquid—usually soy milk—after it has finished cooking. It has a lovely, creamy consistency as a result, which I enjoy. Oatmeal cooked in a slow cooker also works well. Additionally, I add it to baked oats.

Pancakes: I have a number of go-to pancake recipes, which are vegan and mostly gluten-free. They taste great. The vegan recipe calls for soy milk. You wouldn’t notice these weren’t dairy-based!

Muffins: Soy milk works well with muffins, just like it does with pancakes. In your muffin recipes, simply replace the usual milk with soy milk in an equal amount. These are fantastic and ideal for the fall.

Smoothies: Smoothies made with soy milk are my favorite. 

Coffee and teas: To make coffee or tea even better, add a little soy milk.  It gives my morning cup the ideal flavor boost.

Other Plant Milk Recipes To Try:

Frequently Asked Questions

Is Soy Milk Healthy And Nutritious?

Yes! Soy milk is rich in all types of nourishment and offers a number of health benefits.

Comparing soy milk to dairy milk is one of its best qualities. Whole cow’s milk contains 12g of carbs and sugars in addition to 8g of protein and fats per 8 oz drink. Unsweetened Soy milk contains 4g carbs, 1g sugar, 4g fat, and 7g protein. Additionally, it has fewer calories (in certain cases, roughly half those of whole milk) and is the same as 1% milk.

There are nine necessary amino acids in soy, which makes it an excellent supply of protein and a good source of carbs and fat.

Soy milk, plant-based milk, is naturally free of cholesterol and low in saturated fat, making it a fantastic milk choice for heart health, weight loss, and weight control.

Soy milk is naturally lactose-free, making it a superb choice for those who are lactose intolerant.

Making your own soy milk at home is also high in vitamins and minerals such as vitamin A, B12, and potassium.

According to a study, soy milk also contains “isoflavones,” which are antioxidants. Thus, they reduce inflammation and may potentially have anticancer properties to reduce the risk of getting various diseases.

Studies have shown that eating soy protein on a regular basis may help reduce the body’s dangerous levels of LDL cholesterol.

What’s The Difference Between Soy Milk And Almond Milk?

Almond milk and soy milk are two distinct types of plant-based milk. I frequently use both of them for various purposes and switch back and forth between them. I use soy milk for cooking and baking, while almond milk is my favorite addition to tea, coffee, and smoothies.

Can I Freeze It?

Soy milk can be frozen to keep it for later use, however, freezing does modify both the consistency and flavor of the milk a little. I recommend cooking with frozen soy milk rather than drinking it straight if it has been frozen. Make sure to store it in a container that doesn’t let air in so it doesn’t get weird flavors while it’s in the freezer. In the freezer, it can be kept for 1-3 months.

What To Serve With This Recipe?

It goes great with any kind of meal. I suggest the following recipes for a wholesome breakfast:

Is Making Soy Milk At Home Safe?

Yes, in most cases, it is entirely safe to produce and consume homemade soy milk. Make sure to get high-quality soybeans, make sure your equipment is clean, and utilize clean water.

Soybeans do include anti-nutrients that our stomachs find challenging to digest and which, in some cases, can be toxic. Because of this, it’s necessary to cook the okara and soy milk before consuming them. Although consuming raw soybeans can result in transient stomach issues, there may also be some long-term side effects.

What To Do With The Soybean Pulp (Okara)?

I strongly suggest that soybean pulp not be thrown. In Japanese, they are also referred to as Okara. Okara is mainly a byproduct of producing tofu and soymilk. They are nourishing and fibrous. They are eaten and utilized in numerous cuisines in China, Korea, and Japan. I’ve been using the okara to make cakes, bread, and brownies.

 

Give this a shot. It’s incredibly delicious and super easy. 

As always, if you like and enjoy this recipe, please leave a comment to let me know your feedback.

Soy milk overlay in a glass an a pitcher

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Soy Milk Recipe in glass cup

Soy Milk Recipe

The soy milk recipe is an excellent substitute for cow’s milk and much healthier for you. It is easy and affordable to make, and tastes delicious!
Print Pin Rate
Course: Beverage, Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Soy Milk Recipe
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 6 servings
Calories: 52kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 cup soybeans
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • sweetener to taste
  • Pinch of salt optional

Instructions

  • Rinse soybeans and discard water.
  • Add soybeans to a large bowl and cover with water, about 2 inches above the soybeans.
  • Soak soybeans overnight or for 8 hours.
  • The following day, remove the soybean skin and rinse the soybeans. Add 1 cup of soaked soybeans along with 3 cups of water to the blender and process until smooth. Repeat until all the beans are processed.
  • Strain soymilk using a nut milk bag or cheesecloth and set the pulp aside to make patties.
  • Transfer the soymilk to a large pot and bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a wooden spatula. reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. If a film occurs on the top, remove it and save it, it is tofu skin.
  • Allow soymilk to cool, and stir in salt, vanilla, and your favorite sweetener. Keep refrigerated.

Nutrition

Calories: 52kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 0.4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 78mg | Potassium: 149mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 3IU | Vitamin C: 0.5mg | Calcium: 35mg | Iron: 1mg